Personal Website.

I had posted a small tutorial for making your life with \LaTeX that tiny bit easier and more automated earlier. Today I want to introduce you to another very useful tool in that respect: texcount. It’s a Perl script that will parse your \LaTeX file and count words and formulae in sections and captions. Just download and unpack the archive to somewhere on your computer and you’re ready to use it. Read the rest of this entry »

The poster Mark and I presented at the Litmus exhibition launch

The poster Mark and I presented at the Litmus exhibition launch

Yesterday was the day of the Litmus exhibition launch, which I had talked about earlier. The six posters, which covered various topics like quantum chemistry and traffic lights, all emerged from a collaboration between a scientist and a writer and look fantastic! They can be viewed in the Hartley Library Gallery (4th floor) until next week. After that the posters will be hung up in the scientists’ buildings.

I am very pleased with the result and I hope I can take part again next year, this time with my actual PhD topic.

I’ve started using LaTeX when I started my degree at uni a bit more than 5 years ago. When I first heard about it I thought it was a software like Microsoft Office, just not as horrible with the formatting. That has all changed and LaTeX has become my language of choice for writing papers, reports, coursework or anything closely related. I found it quite handy that there are so many different editors available until I have recently discovered the best of them all: Emacs + make. Read the rest of this entry »

Have you ever wondered what happens when scientists and poets work together? Register for the Litmus Science & Poetry Event on 18/03 during Multidisciplinary Week to find out!

Making science available for a broad audience is something that is very important to me. I’ve worked together with Gosport based writer Mark Iles and he has created a brilliant poem on eutrophication that will be exhibited in the Gallery above the Hartley Library until 22/03. After that it will go into Building 16, where I am working.

Litmus: Poetry & Science Event

Litmus: Poetry & Science Event

Passwords are quite a tedious topic: We all know that we are supposed to have a different password on every website or service that we use, but we also all know that it is quite impossible to remember a different one for each of these. So we end up writing them down somewhere or only have very few passwords that get used on several websites. You could probably argue both ways that either only having a few passwords or writing them down is less safe. As a matter of fact they’re both quite unsafe. Read the rest of this entry »

My New Year’s resolution for 2013 arose with my efforts to try and treat our environment in the best possible way that I can, because, let’s face it, there are enough people who don’t. This goal surely is limited by several factors, such as money. However, there are some things that we can do, which are even great for the wallet. Going paperless is one of them. I am not trying to say that one should ditch all paper use from one day to another, simply because it sometimes isn’t possible. You will still receive mail through your letter box and (with respect to being a scientist) you will still have to print and hand sign out your travel claims forms. Read the rest of this entry »

I’ve uploaded my essay “De-Centralising Our Mindset” on centralised and decentralised systems. It was written as an assignment for the course “Introduction to Complexity Science”. Enjoy!